How to keep you, your family, and your pets safe in the heat

MORNING. ALL RIGHT, LNYEN. THANK YOU VERY MUCH. WELL THIS KIND OF HEAT CAN TURN DANGEROUS VERY VERY QUICKLY DOCTORS AT NOVANT HEALTH WANT TO BE SURE THAT EVERYBODY KNOWS HOW TO BE SAFE IF YOU HEAV TO BE OUTSIDE TOMORROW WXI 12’S MARIA DEBONE SPOKE WITH A NURSE RELATED ILLNESS MARIA. YEAH, PATRICIA WILLIAMS WITH NOVANT HEALTH SDAI ERYVE SUMMER AROUND THIS TIME IS WHEN THEY START TO SEE MORE PEOPLE CEOM IN THWI HEAT RELATED ILLNESSES LIKE HEAT STROKE HEAT EXHAUSTION AND HEAT RASH, BUT S SHEAID THERE ARE SIGNS TO ARE SIGNS TO . AS A COMPENSATORY MECHANISM THAT TRIES TO COOL ITSELF OFF WITH SWEATING ETC. BUT WHEN WE’RE TALKING ABOUT THESE KIND OF HIGH TEMPERATURES MANY TIMES. OUR BODY IS JUST NOT ABLE TO KEEP UP NOVANT HEALTH NURSE PRACTITIONER. PATRICIA WILLIAMS SAID THAT’S WHEN BEGINNING SNSIG OF HEAT RELATED ILLNESSES CAN BE SEEN SUCHS A FASTER HEART RATE HEADACHES DIZZINESS FATIGUE SLEEPINESS INCREASED THIRST IRRITABILITY CONFUSION OR SLURRED SPEECH. IN WHEN YOU’RE STARTING TO FEEL THAT LITTLE BIT OF LIGHTHEADEDNESS DIZZINESS GET OUT OF T HHEEAT GET YOURSELF INTO A COOLER PLACE WHEN IT BE A SHADED AREA BETTER YET EVEN A AIR CONDIONTIED AREA WILLIAM SAID IF YOU HAVE TO BE OUT CLOTHING AND DRINK LOTS OF WATER. SHE SAID EVERYONE SHOULD BE AWARE OF HEAT RELATED ILLNESSES, BUT CHILDREN THE ELDERLYND A THOSE ON BLOOD PRESSURE MEDICATIONS ARE ARE SUSCEPTIBLE ENWH YOU’RE TALKING ABOUT TEMPERATURES OF UPPER 90S WHEN OUR BODY HEAT A BAT TWO THEN GETTING UP TO THE 103. THAT’S WHAT WE’RE GOING TO GET INTO SOME MAJOR PROBLEMS SO THAT HAPPEN VERY QUICKLY. AND WILLIAM SAID THOSE TEMPERATURES WILL RISE FASTER IN A CAR AND TO SHOW YOU JUST HOW HOT IT CAN GET. WE HAVE A HEAT RADAR GUN HERE. IT’S 93 OUTSIDE RIGHT NOW, BUT INSIDE IF WEUT P IT ON THE DASH THAT IN OUR CAR THAT’S BEEN SITTING HERE FOR A LITTLE BIT. IT’S GNGOI UP TO ABOUT 126 127 DEGREES. SO WILLIAM SDAI IT IS CRUCIAL TO NOT LEAVE KSID OR PETSNS IIDE

How to keep you, your family, and your pets safe in the heat

With temperatures in the 90s in the Piedmont Triad this week, doctors and humane societies are sharing tips for how to beat the heat and stay safe. Patricia Williams, a nurse practitioner with Novant Health, said every summer, this is the time they start to see more people come in with heat-related illnesses like heat rash, stroke or exhaustion. “Our body has a compensatory mechanism that tries to cool itself off with sweating, etc. But when we’re talking about these kind of high temperatures, many times our body is just not able to keep up, “Williams said. , dizziness, fatigue, sleepiness, increased thirst, irritability, confusion, or slurred speech. Williams said, “When you’re starting to feel that little bit of lightheadedness, dizziness, get out of the heat. Get yourself into a cooler place, whether it be a shaded area, better yet, even an air-conditioned area. ”Williams said if you have to be outside, to wear light-colored clothing and drink lots of water. She said everyone should be aware of heat-related illnesses but children, older people and those on blood pressure medications are more susceptible. The heat can be dangerous to us, but also to our pets.Geralyn Kelly, a dog trainer and owner of Elite Canine Training, said it’s not just hot cars that pet owners have to worry about leaving their dogs in, but even just being outside for too long can cause heat-related illnesses that can be fatal. “In this heat that we have coming up now, shade is not enough for them. Water bowls are not enough for them, “Kelly said.Kelly teaches dog safety classes at the Forsyth Humane Society. She said no dog should be outside for too long, especially if they’re double-coated breeds like labs, golden retrievers and shepherds. . If your dog is panting really hard, sweating, or you just think your dog is overheated, there are ways to cool them down. “Heatstroke, if it does happen or your dog is overheated, the first thing you want to remember is never put them in ice water or any kind of cool water. Dropping their temperatures too quickly could put them into shock which is very, you know, can be fatal, ”Kelly said.Kelly said, of course, take them into air conditioning but said you can take alcohol swabs and rub their pads on their paws or put a cool compress on their stomach area. “If you feel like you’re not doing enough or you’re really worried, go to the vet,” Kelly said. “Don’t wait because that’s when you’re going to have a problem if you wait for too long. So if you have that gut feeling that there’s something wrong, even if there’s nothing wrong when you get there, it’s worth taking them. ” It’s not just hot cars, pet owners should be aware of, but the pavement can heat up in a matter of minutes too. “Their paws are very delicate. The five-second rule is very important to remember. If you take your hand and put it upside down on the pavement in five seconds, whatever you’re feeling on your skin. That’s what they’re feeling on their feet, “Kelly said.Kelly said instead of walking them on the pavement, force them onto the grass or try walking them in the morning or later at night when it’s not so hot.

With temperatures in the 90s in the Piedmont Triad this week, doctors and humane societies are sharing tips for how to beat the heat and stay safe.

Patricia Williams, a nurse practitioner with Novant Health, said every summer, this is the time they start to see more people come in with heat-related illnesses like heat rash, stroke or exhaustion.

“Our body has a compensatory mechanism that tries to cool itself off with sweating, etc. But when we’re talking about these kind of high temperatures, many times our body is just not able to keep up, “Williams said.

Williams said that’s when beginning signs of heat-related illnesses can be seen such as faster heart rate, headaches, dizziness, fatigue, sleepiness, increased thirst, irritability, confusion, or slurred speech.

Williams said, “When you’re starting to feel that little bit of lightheadedness, dizziness, get out of the heat. Get yourself into a cooler place, whether it be a shaded area, better yet, even an air-conditioned area.”

Williams said if you have to be outside, to wear light-colored clothing and drink lots of water. She said everyone should be aware of heat-related illnesses but children, older people and those on blood pressure medications are more susceptible.

The heat can be dangerous to us, but also to our pets.

Geralyn Kelly, a dog trainer and owner of Elite Canine Training, said it’s not just hot cars that pet owners have to worry about leaving their dogs in, but even just being outside for too long can cause heat-related illnesses that can be fatal.

“In this heat that we have coming up now, shade is not enough for them. Water bowls are not enough for them, “Kelly said.

Kelly teaches dog safety classes at the Forsyth Humane Society. She said no dog should be outside for too long, especially if they’re double-coated breeds like labs, golden retrievers and shepherds.

If your dog is panting really hard, sweating, or you just think your dog is overheated, there are ways to cool them down.

“Heatstroke, if it does happen or your dog is overheated, the first thing you want to remember is never put them in ice water or any kind of cool water. Dropping their temperatures too quickly could put them into shock which is very, you know. , can be fatal, ”Kelly said.

Kelly said, of course, take them into air conditioning but said you can take alcohol swabs and rub their pads on their paws or put a cool compress on their stomach area.

“If you feel like you’re not doing enough or you’re really worried, go to the vet,” Kelly said. “Don’t wait because that’s when you’re going to have a problem if you wait for too long. So if you have that gut feeling that there’s something wrong, even if there’s nothing wrong when you get there, it’s worth taking them. “

It’s not just hot cars, pet owners should be aware of, but the pavement can heat up in a matter of minutes too.

“Their paws are very delicate. The five-second rule is very important to remember. If you take your hand and put it upside down on the pavement in five seconds, whatever you’re feeling on your skin. That’s what they’re feeling. on their feet, “Kelly said.

Kelly said instead of walking them on the pavement, force them onto the grass or try walking them in the morning or later at night when it’s not so hot.

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